Review – The Ballad of Buster Scruggs

The Ballad of Buster Scruggs, written and directed by Joel and Ethan Coen, has ample opportunity to fill you with a bevy of emotions. It could delight you, it could unnerve you, it could fill you with sadness or leave you feeling full of joy… but unfortunately my time spent with the film left me mostly feeling bored and full of sighs of tedium. Despite a varied and talented cast, and six individual short stories, there’s a constant flat emptiness to the proceedings of the film, and only in two of the stories did I ever find myself caring about the little tales I was experiencing. There’s certainly much to unpack with this film, so let’s not dilly-dally with the introduction anymore and instead get on with the review. Read more

Review – Widows

Widows, co-written and directed by Steve McQueen, is yet another enthralling piece of cinema from a director who is yet to make a bad film. Enveloping an eclectic and uniquely damaged cast of characters in an ever-evolving story that continuously keeps you on your toes; Widows is a film that engages you and challenges you every step of the way. It’s been too long since I’ve had the pleasure to talk about a McQueen film, so let’s be done with this introduction and get to the review, so I can delight in talking about a director I adore. Read more

Review – A Monster Calls

A Monster Calls, directed by J.A. Bayona, is a wonderfully creative film full of moments that seem like they are pulled directly from a child’s imagination. But it is also a film with a powerful and challenging story at its centre, and all of it is guided by an absolutely outstanding performance from Lewis MacDougall. This is going to be one of those reviews where I gush about the film for a while, so if you’ll indulge me; I’m going to get on with the ramblings. Read more

Review – Silence

silence

Silence, directed by Martin Scorsese, is a film that is unwavering in its effort to explore its primary topic: Religion. Each frame of this film is more beautiful than the last; each performance meets the exact level and presence that is fitting for the moment, and every ounce of the films runtime is dedicated to making sure it fully explores the downfall of its main character and his utter devotion to his faith. Scorsese is no slouch when it comes to the detail in his films, and Silence shows that, but with such detail, also comes the feeling of being given too much. This is a film that dives as deep as it can possibly go into its subject, but it sometimes forgets the need to come back up for air. But let’s get to the fuller review and see if that issue affects the overall experience, let’s see what Silence has to offer. Read more