Review – The Snowman

The Snowman, directed by Tomas Alfredson, is a perfect example of a film that is completely unable to coherently manage the source material it is based upon. A poor start that sees most of the necessary set-up being overlooked and then a lack of any proper exploration of the characters and the plot, quickly sees this film becoming a mismanaged, dull detective story with no thrills and nothing to hold your interest. I was looking forward to this film, but alas, it failed to deliver on what could have potentially been an exciting, unsettling film. So let’s explore where the film went wrong and if there is anything that makes it still worth seeing. Read more

Review – The Mountain Between Us

The Mountain Between Us, directed by Hany Abu-Assad, feels like a film that is unwilling to give the necessary time or focus to… anything. Much of the film is rushed in the beginning and from that we are expected to care about two people who are hollow shells with a single characteristic each. There seemed to be a want to make this about the two leads and they’re growing relationship within a life-threatening situation but it fails at that, and thus the only aspect it could have maybe fallen back on (surviving after crashing on a snowy mountain) is left with nothing to ever make it feel like a contributing part of the film. I’m going to struggle to find anything positive to say about this film, but let’s get to the review. Read more

Review – Blade Runner 2049 (Spoilers)

Blade Runner 2049

*This review contains spoilers for Blade Runner 2049*

Blade Runner 2049, directed by Denis Villeneuve, was everything I wanted it to be and more. The original film is one that splits people; it’s not an easy watch and unless you are willing to give yourself over to how it wants to tell its story, you will struggle to engage with it. Questions do not result in answers – at least not from the film itself. This time round though, it isn’t as difficult a film to approach. There is enough, that I think a general audience can interact and comprehend what the film is trying to do. But that doesn’t mean original fans are left wanting. 2049 is a film that is full of qualities to adore and consume and I’m looking forward to talking about as many of them as I can, while also touching upon the achievements of the first film. So, come with me on this rambling journey through two brilliant films. Read more

Review – Gerald’s Game

Gerald’s Game, directed by Mike Flanagan, delivers a brilliant and explorative deconstruction of its main character. Being visually smart in how it does it and keeping us gripped with a premise that keeps the tension going throughout, the film never struggles in holding your attention. But, I do feel it does one thing in particular that slightly robs it of its effectiveness and left me feeling like some of the punch had been taken out of the film in the end. So, let’s explore the many great aspects of the film and see if that one nagging issue was enough to lessen my opinion of the film, overall. Read more

Review – The Bad Batch

The Bad Batch, written and directed by Ana Lily Amirpour, is… well to be blunt, it’s bad. The film tries desperately to seem edgy and different. It fills scenes with quirky looking/acting people, and it has scenes filled with things that look like their trying desperately to be odd. That’s all it seems to think it needs to make something attention grabbing, but it becomes apparent very early on that the film lacks any actual substance and anything actually interesting. This is going to be one of those reviews I hate to write because it isn’t going to be a kind one. Read more

Review – First They Killed My Father

First They Killed My Father, directed by Angelina Jolie, approaches its harrowing story from a very interesting perspective. That perspective helps to shine a very different light on the events that the film follows, but it does also hinder the film at times; causing we the audience to not always feel like a part of the larger story. At times, it was struggling to fully hold my attention, but then at other points I was completely gripped by it. So, by the end does it deliver a film worth seeing? Let’s answer that question together, in my review. Read more

Review – Kingsman: The Golden Circle

Kingsman: The Golden Circle, directed by Matthew Vaughn, is a loud, crass, childish, empty film that by the end had me completely bored by everything it had to offer. This is the type of film where it tries to fill the screen with seemingly interesting or exciting content, but if you look at it closely (to be honest you don’t have to look that close) you realise just how little this film actually gives itself to work with. I was utterly bored by the end of this film and couldn’t wait for it to be over. But why was that the case? Where did it go wrong to make this the case? Let’s explore those questions and more in my review. Read more

Review – It

It, directed by Andy Muschietti, had me gleefully smiling from ear-to-ear, throughout. Front and centre in this film are a wonderful cast of characters, who thanks to some great balancing, end up being one of the most enjoyable aspects of the whole film, and in turn create a nostalgic feeling kids adventure film; with a serving of disturbing horror. It’s also really refreshing to see a large studio produce a horror film that feels like it was allowed to express itself how it wanted too. There is a clear level of respect and love for the source material and it all results in something that feels like more than just your run of the mill horror film. But what exactly is it about this film that makes it so enjoyable – seeing as it doesn’t really do anything new or original with the horror format? Well, let’s explore the film through this review and find out. Read more

Review – mother!

mother! Written and directed by Darren Aronofsky, was at first a very atmospheric, very tense feeling film, that then went on to become this very empty, repetitive feeling film, and then it transitioned into something surreal, and then from there it became overly farcical, and then by the end there was something truly profound about it. It was a journey that was ever changing; sometimes it was good and other times it wasn’t, but there was always something to it that, in some way, kept me watching it. The experience of watching this film was like it was slicing its way slowly but deeply into me and then staying there, waiting; in the end exploding into something I couldn’t stop myself from thinking about. This is going to be a challenging review but one I’m interested to write, so let’s get to it. Read more

Review – American Assassin

American Assassin, directed by Michael Cuesta, is as bland as an action movie can possibly get. Almost every element of this film is either failed in its execution or overlooked as a possibly stimulating addition to the film. Nothing ever pays off in a way that makes sitting through this film worthwhile and nothing ever happens that makes it an exciting watch. It is nothing but mundane. But where does the problem lie? Is there anything that perhaps sneaks to the surface and creates some level of interest? Let’s dissect the film in my review and find out. Read more

Review – Wind River

Wind River, written and directed by Taylor Sheridan, is a film with a haunting, quiet rage pulsating throughout it. With a vast, chilling landscape, some deeply nuanced characters and a plot that slowly hollows you out; Wind River is a film that makes its way into your bones and leaves you thinking about it, long after the credits have rolled. But what it is specifically about this film that makes it so memorable? I plan to answer that question and explore as much of this film as possible, through my review. So, let’s get to it. Read more

Review – God’s Own Country

God’s Own Country, written and directed by Francis Lee, is at times lonely; it is at times beautiful, but it is at all times honest. I at first didn’t find myself that pulled in by the film; the main character made me a little standoffish. But as it progressed and the true beauty and fulfilment of the film came to me, I became utterly surrounded by it. But why was that? What was it about this film that now makes me consider it one of my favourite films of the year so far? Well, let’s find out in my review. Read more

Review – Logan Lucky

Logan Lucky, directed by Steven Soderbergh, is a film that is full of so much character. Not only do you have the eclectic selections of characters to enjoy, but you also have the all-American setting; filled with NASCAR, a lively culture that loves and respects its history and an overall charm and wholesomeness that just exists throughout the film. You take all of that and then inject it with the unique essence that makes up Virginia and the surrounding areas, and you get something that really stands-out and makes its presence known. And it is also a film that constructs and delivers a heist plot that keeps all the fun moving with purpose. This is a film that is brimming with wonderful amounts of charm and fun, and it never lets up. But can the film really be all enjoyment and no underlying problems? Well, let’s find out in my review. Read more

Review – American Made

American Made, directed by Doug Liman, tells an unbelievable story – that’s not hyperbole. The true story in which this film is based upon, will leave you slack-jawed and wide-eyed. In a refreshing departure from his usual bulletproof, all action all the time roles, Tom Cruise helps to deliver a fun, wild adventure that shows that anything is impossible in the United States of America. However, the film might be all flash and nothing meaningful, but let’s explore if that is the case in my review. Read more

Review – Detroit

Detroit, directed by Kathryn Bigelow, struggles at times with its pacing and it also feels like it stretches its focus too thin. It does make it difficult at first to find the rhythm of the film, but once it gets to its primary focus, Bigelow is able to deliver an intense, gripping experience. But, does the films problems in pacing rob it of its power? Does the film not fully accomplish what it wants to do? I want to explore those questions and more in my review of Detroit, so let’s get to it. Read more

Review – The Hitman’s Bodyguard

The Hitman’s Bodyguard, directed by Patrick Hughes, could best be described as your quintessential ‘Buddy Cop’ film, minus the fact that the two lead characters aren’t cops (credit for that opening line has to go to my friend, Ross who I’m paraphrasing). This is a film that doesn’t ever do anything particularly new or original, but that still doesn’t detract from how fun, silly and entertaining it constantly is. I went into this film knowing what I was going to get, but is that still a good enough reason to suggest this as a good film? Well, let’s find out through this review, shall we. Read more

Review – The Dark Tower

The Dark Tower, directed by Nikolaj Arcel, is a film that spends 95 minutes desperately trying to set up and explain its world, its characters and the rules that bind them, and yet after all that, I am still no clearer as to what the point of any of it was. There is no fun, excitement or intrigue in this film – that was bled out of the film a long time ago. There is just failed exposition and some truly odd performances from actors who are usually dependable. So let’s get onto dissecting this film, through my review, and see what it is that doesn’t work about it.   Read more

Review – Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets

Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets, written and directed by Luc Besson, delivers a fantastical universe, filled with creatures, locations and set-pieces that dazzle the eyes. But… well that’s pretty much it. Valerian is a film bursting with things to look at, but beyond that there is a notable dearth of compelling content. So, is Luc Besson’s long envisioned project all show and no substance? Well, let’s explore that and more in my review. Read more

Review – A Ghost Story

A Ghost Story, written and directed by David Lowery, feels almost like a test – a test of the audience’s patience, a test of their commitment, and a test of their willingness to accept what they are watching. From my time with the film, quite a few of the people in the audience struggled to overcome those tests (which is understandable). This is a film where you need to be willing to let the film tell its story how it wants too. It doesn’t play by the rules in any way and that can make for an experience that feels difficult to interact with. But what exactly is it about this film that might make it so challenging for audiences? Well, let’s explore that and more through this review.
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Review – Atomic Blonde

Atomic Blonde, directed by David Leitch, is a film with an infectious style. With its pulsating soundtrack, its vibrant colours, its delightfully brutal actions scenes and it all being within the backdrop of Berlin in 1989 – there’s much to gorge your senses on, in Atomic Blonde. However, the film doesn’t really go beyond that. There isn’t much depth for you to sink your teeth in to. But, does that diminish the overall experience? Well, let’s find out in this review. Read more