Review – God of War

God of War, developed by Santa Monica Studio and published Sony, is a never-ending, seamlessly executed single player adventure of epic proportions. Sony continues their dominance with first-party, narratively driven single player experiences; with a game that will undoubtedly be remembered as one of this console generations standout games. There’s a lot to talk about (and I won’t get to touch on everything) and I’m eager to get to that talking, so let’s dispense with the introduction and get to reviewing God of War. Read more

Review – Ghost Stories

Ghost Stories, written and directed by Jeremy Dyson and Andy Nyman, pulls you in with a familiar set of tales and then slowly weaves a narrative that will frighten you, amuse you and have you questioning everything that you’ve just watched. What I thought would be a simple little British horror film became something that left me wide-eyed and excited to write this review. I’ll have to dodge and weave through this one though, as I don’t want to step on any spoiler filled land mines. Let’s get to the review, shall we. Read more

Review – Brigsby Bear

Brigsby Bear, directed by Dave McCary, traverses a number of tones that end up causing a confusing feeling experience that at times is difficult to find a connection with. There is sincerity in the creativity within this film and there are moments that fill your heart with uplifting feelings. But there are also times where I sat with a furrowed brow, trying to understand what the intention of the scenes were and what type of film Brigsby Bear was trying to be. I shifted between liking this film and struggling to understand it, which made for a watching experience in which I never felt settled. I think (hope) breaking down how this film operates will help me figure out how I truly felt about it. So let’s get to it. Read more

Review – Thoroughbreds

Thoroughbreds, written and directed by Cory Finley, offers two main characters who continually fascinate you and have you forever questioning their motives and what they are really thinking. This was a film that at times felt rudderless. It knew where it wanted to be and knew the general direction for getting there, but there seemed to be a lack of a driving force to get them there in a stable, concicive way. But, there is still something to this film that pulls you and intrigues you. Something that resulted in me being at all times interested in seeing where it was going. This is one of those films that sticks around in your head long after it’s done. So let’s explore what Thoroughbreds gets right and what it doesn’t, and see if this is a film you should check out. Read more

Review – A Quiet Place

A Quiet Place, co-written and directed by John Krasinski, holds you in the palm of its hand and toys with you whenever it feels like it. Sound – or the lack of it – plays a crucial role in this film and it is used to great effect. I can’t remember the last time I sat in a cinema that was so consumed by silence. The film is certainly light on story and characters, but what it does with them is effective in creating an atmosphere that is unrelenting, and an experience that grips you completely. Krasinski has certainly shown to me that he has a future in the horror genre, but before that becomes the case, let’s breakdown and explore, A Quiet Place. Read more

Review – Journeyman

Journeyman, written and directed by Paddy Considine, is not an easy watch. Not because it’s bad. Far from it. It’s because of Considine’s ability as both a writer and a director to tap into the real hardships that people face and then focus fully in on it. He writes stories that are tough and have no easy solution. He creates characters that can be challenging and not always the people you want them to be. Like I said, Journeyman is not easy watch – and it will certainly not be a film that everyone has the fortitude for – but there’s a powerful experience in Journeyman, and one I’m interested to talk about. So, let’s find out if this is a film for you. Read more

Review – Ready Player One

Ready Player One, directed by Steven Spielberg, is pretty much what I was expecting. At times it was entertaining and full of that Spielberg blockbuster magic. And other times it was quite irritating; with intrusive, lazy exposition, and a lack of competent character development. It’s a film that never lets up. It is full-on with everything. From the infamous amount of references, we were all expecting, to the visual magnitude of all those pop-culture references. It seemed the only thing it didn’t feel the need to go full-on with, where characters or the development of them. I was never bored when watching this film, but I also wasn’t ever invested or had any care for who or what I was watching. I’m mixed on how I want to review this film, as on one hand there’s a lot I could say against it, but on the other, it doesn’t ever stop being what it ultimately is: a fun, mindless blockbuster. I suppose I’ll figure out in my review how I truly feel about this film, so let’s go find out. Read more

Review – Isle of Dogs

Isle of Dogs, written and directed by Wes Anderson, is infinitely charming and forever witty (as you’d probably expect). There’s such a wonderful feeling that your filled with when watching a Wes Anderson film; the man knows how to put together an experience that invites you in, makes you feel totally comfortable and then guides you along on a journey full of smiles, laughter and fulfilment – Isle of Dogs is all those qualities and more. Now if you’ll allow me, I’d like to invite you on into my review of what is a beautifully crafted film. Read more

Review – Unsane

Unsane, directed by Steven Soderbergh, will unnerve you; it will have you questioning everything, and it will keep you on edge; toying with your assumptions and your comfort levels. It’s in director, Steven Soderbergh’s decision on how to shoot this film, that Unsane becomes a film that from its very first scene has you feeling off-balance. It looks different; it feels different and you’re in a situation that feels… uncomfortable. This film immediately pulled me in with all of these elements and much more. I’m eager to talk about them; particularly Soderbergh’s interesting decision on how to shoot the film and if it works. So, let’s get to it. Read more