Review – 1922

1922

1922, written and directed by Zak Hilditch, lacks anything that might possibly make it a creepy, suspenseful, meaningful watch. It rushes to get to a particular scene, but once it’s seen it through, the film seems lost as to what to then do. To me, it was clear what to do, but apparently not for the people telling the story or making the film. But is this spooky looking film one that would be good during Halloween? Well, let’s explore what the film has and find out. Read more

Review – The Death of Stalin

The Death of Stalin, directed by Armando Iannucci, is both one of the funniest films I’ve seen this year and also one of the darkest films I’ve seen this year. The film has great fun with its story and fills the scenes with richly devious individuals who you love to hate. Armando Iannucci is brilliant at cutting to the core of the stupidity of people and situations (his previous work like, The Thick of It, being a prime example of this) and the film is full of conversations, backstabbing and horrendous acts that leave you laughing, but also a little uncomfortable. There is humour and there is also darkness, but what is it that makes this film so much fun to watch? Let’s explore that and more in my review. Read more

Review – A Monster Calls

A Monster Calls, directed by J.A. Bayona, is a wonderfully creative film full of moments that seem like they are pulled directly from a child’s imagination. But it is also a film with a powerful and challenging story at its centre, and all of it is guided by an absolutely outstanding performance from Lewis MacDougall. This is going to be one of those reviews where I gush about the film for a while, so if you’ll indulge me; I’m going to get on with the ramblings. Read more

Review – The Meyerowitz Stories

The Meyerowitz Stories, written and directed by Noah Baumbach, has a wonderfully addictive rhythm to it. That rhythm doesn’t come from an overstated score or a movement from the actors that dominates the scene; instead it comes from a highly dysfunctional family’s way of communicating with one another. They almost seem to verbally duel one another, with words that move fast and land in a way that seems to physically hurts. It is this damaged, defensive family’s history, that a touching, funny film comes from. I’ve wanted to review a Baumbach film for a while now and I’m excited to finally do so. Let’s get to it. Read more

Review – The Party

The Party, written and directed by Sally Potter, offers one of those situations where you shouldn’t be laughing but you can’t help yourself because the biting dialogue is just so on point. With a wonderful selection of characters and a premise that is simple and engaging, this film delivers a quick little hit of meaningful fun. I left the cinema with a grin on my face, but what was about, The Party that caused me to feel so satisfied? Let’s explore that question and more in my review. Read more

Review – The Snowman

The Snowman, directed by Tomas Alfredson, is a perfect example of a film that is completely unable to coherently manage the source material it is based upon. A poor start that sees most of the necessary set-up being overlooked and then a lack of any proper exploration of the characters and the plot, quickly sees this film becoming a mismanaged, dull detective story with no thrills and nothing to hold your interest. I was looking forward to this film, but alas, it failed to deliver on what could have potentially been an exciting, unsettling film. So let’s explore where the film went wrong and if there is anything that makes it still worth seeing. Read more

Review – The Mountain Between Us

The Mountain Between Us, directed by Hany Abu-Assad, feels like a film that is unwilling to give the necessary time or focus to… anything. Much of the film is rushed in the beginning and from that we are expected to care about two people who are hollow shells with a single characteristic each. There seemed to be a want to make this about the two leads and they’re growing relationship within a life-threatening situation but it fails at that, and thus the only aspect it could have maybe fallen back on (surviving after crashing on a snowy mountain) is left with nothing to ever make it feel like a contributing part of the film. I’m going to struggle to find anything positive to say about this film, but let’s get to the review. Read more

Review – Blade Runner 2049 (Spoilers)

Blade Runner 2049

*This review contains spoilers for Blade Runner 2049*

Blade Runner 2049, directed by Denis Villeneuve, was everything I wanted it to be and more. The original film is one that splits people; it’s not an easy watch and unless you are willing to give yourself over to how it wants to tell its story, you will struggle to engage with it. Questions do not result in answers – at least not from the film itself. This time round though, it isn’t as difficult a film to approach. There is enough, that I think a general audience can interact and comprehend what the film is trying to do. But that doesn’t mean original fans are left wanting. 2049 is a film that is full of qualities to adore and consume and I’m looking forward to talking about as many of them as I can, while also touching upon the achievements of the first film. So, come with me on this rambling journey through two brilliant films. Read more

Review – Gerald’s Game

Gerald’s Game, directed by Mike Flanagan, delivers a brilliant and explorative deconstruction of its main character. Being visually smart in how it does it and keeping us gripped with a premise that keeps the tension going throughout, the film never struggles in holding your attention. But, I do feel it does one thing in particular that slightly robs it of its effectiveness and left me feeling like some of the punch had been taken out of the film in the end. So, let’s explore the many great aspects of the film and see if that one nagging issue was enough to lessen my opinion of the film, overall. Read more

Review – The Bad Batch

The Bad Batch, written and directed by Ana Lily Amirpour, is… well to be blunt, it’s bad. The film tries desperately to seem edgy and different. It fills scenes with quirky looking/acting people, and it has scenes filled with things that look like their trying desperately to be odd. That’s all it seems to think it needs to make something attention grabbing, but it becomes apparent very early on that the film lacks any actual substance and anything actually interesting. This is going to be one of those reviews I hate to write because it isn’t going to be a kind one. Read more

Review – First They Killed My Father

First They Killed My Father, directed by Angelina Jolie, approaches its harrowing story from a very interesting perspective. That perspective helps to shine a very different light on the events that the film follows, but it does also hinder the film at times; causing we the audience to not always feel like a part of the larger story. At times, it was struggling to fully hold my attention, but then at other points I was completely gripped by it. So, by the end does it deliver a film worth seeing? Let’s answer that question together, in my review. Read more