Review – Overlord

Overlord, directed by Julius Avery, has an interesting premise, a setting that’s always rich for compelling stories and an opening scene that had me feeling really positive about the journey I was about to set out on. And so, even with all that, it’s a real shame that Overlord doesn’t take advantage of any of them and instead embarks on a meandering, boring experience that never amounts to anything memorable or interesting and slowly but surely devolved into a film that struggled to hold my attention for any significant amount of time. Where is it Overlord goes so wrong? Is there anything that maybe makes it worth your time? Well, let’s explore all that Overlord has to offer and see if there’s anything to it that can salvage what is mostly a forgettable film. Read more

Review – Apostle

Apostle, written and directed by Gareth Evans, has within it many secrets, mysteries and unyielding brutality, and all of it is enacted by an assortment of severely broken characters who all in their own way have something to them that intrigues you or unsettles you. But is that enough to make Apostle an engaging watch? The quality and answers to some of them are perhaps not. Let’s explore all of this and more in my review, shall we. Read more

Review – Bohemian Rhapsody

Bohemian Rhapsody, directed by Brian Singer (and technically also Dexter Fletcher), is a cheap, shallow film that uses the joy inducing music of Queen, and a possible career best performance from Rami Malek to try and make you think it’s better than it actually is. Beyond the music we all know and love; this is a film that is devoid of anything that feels… alive. For much of my time with Bohemian Rhapsody, I was either frustrated, unengaged and so desperately wishing it would give the exposure to the characters that they deserved. This is the worst kind of biopic film and my review will sadly be centred around what that is, so let’s get to it. Read more

Review – Halloween

Halloween, co-written and directed by David Gordon Green, had me completely hooked. I sat there in my seat giddy at what I was seeing; a good Halloween film that was paying homage to the original in a way that I loved, while also standing on its own as something new and exciting. But then a significant shift in the film’s tone occurred during its middle portion; all that was good disappeared, and the film shifted into a place that DIDN’T work and had me feeling severely deflated. But then it brought it back for an ending that maybe won me back. I’m really eager to dive into this new Halloween film; explore where it goes very right and also very wrong and see if this is a film that I can recommend, because I’m genuinely still not sure. I’m very conflicted on how I feel about this one, but that’s because I so wanted it to be good. Anyway, let’s bring this rambling introduction to an end and get on with the damn review. Read more

Review – First Man

First Man, directed by Damien Chazelle, takes a bold direction with one of history’s most well-known and beloved figures. Rather than a pleasant, uplifting exploration of the life of Neil Armstrong, First Man pulls back the curtain and explores the darker, far more depressing story of a man who truly lived a life full of struggle and pain. However, with a solemn atmosphere and a hefty feeling runtime, I do think this is a film that some audience goers might struggle with. So, let’s explore all that First Man has to offer, and the methods it employs to do so, to see if it’s a film you’ll be wanting to see. Read more

Review – Bad Times at the El Royale

Bad Times at the El Royale, written and directed by Drew Goddard, is a film that fully luxuriates and indulges – and sometimes languishes – in its dialogue heavy scenes. While some serious trimming could have occurred to help streamline this film, it does mean you’ll never find yourself wanting for more. With nuanced and intriguing characters and a plot that is always full of twists and turns, Bad Times at the El Royale justifies its overly indulgent ways (to an extent). So, let’s dive deeper into the offerings of this film and see if it’s one that you’ll want to see. Read more

Review – The Wife

* This review contains SPOILERS for The Wife! *

The Wife, directed by Björn Runge, initially seemed to be a pretty sedate, simple film that would for the most part engage me. But, as it went on, two towering performances from two incredible actors (Glenn Close and Jonathan Pryce) slowly drew me into a film that had me completely gripped. There’s nothing particularly standout about this film (or so it seems) but when you begin to dive deeper into the film’s two lead characters and the performances from those leads intensifies in quality and depth, you’ll find yourself lost in a story that completely holds you. So, let’s explore the inner workings of this film and see if it’s one you might fancy checking out. Onto the review. Read more

Review – Venom

Venom, directed by Ruben Fleischer, is as bad as you were probably expecting it to be. A nonsensical, uninteresting plot. A tone that sees the film never knowing what type of experience it wants to offer. A total lack of characters or development. Terrible, incomprehensible action. Pretty much across the board, Venom is a film that simply and unfortunately fails. Not even the manic charisma of Tom Hardy can rescue the film from leaving you bored and frustrated. Well, let’s get on with the (autopsy) review and explore just exactly where this film goes so wrong. Read more

Review – A Star is Born

A Star is Born, co-written and directed by Bradley Cooper, has at its core an uplifting, chemistry-imbued relationship that keeps the film forever feeling like a meaningful, endearing watch. Two strong lead performances and a story that is light in scale but heavy with themes and emotion also played an integral part in making my time with the film feeling worthwhile. I at all times felt engaged with the characters on-screen and was eager to see where their journey would lead. I think my only issue with the film would be the depth of exploration for the characters as individuals, but I’ll of course touch upon that in greater detail in my review. So, there’s plenty to talk about when it comes to A Star is Born, so let’s dispense with this rambling introduction and get to the review itself. Read more

Review – The Little Stranger

The Little Stranger, directed by Lenny Abrahamson, was a film where I felt as if I was continually waiting for something to happen, but nothing ever did. Watching this film is like being in a wave machine of potentially compelling elements. It raises you up and begins to push you towards something that seems really interesting, only to go back down again and never amount to anything, and it repeats this cycle for the entirety of its run. This will be an unfortunate review to write as it will involve me being quite harsh about the quality (or lack thereof) of this film and its various elements. So let’s get to it and discover if there’s anything in The Little Stranger that makes it worth your time and money. Read more

Review – The Predator

The Predator, co-written and directed by Shane Black, is a bewildering, nonsensical mess that left me confused, conflicted and struggling to understand the reactions I was having to it. There were elements and moments to this film that I liked, and I’ll definitely talk about them in this review. But there was a lot in this film that I didn’t like, and I’ll perhaps go as far as to say I hated, but more than my likes and my dislikes there was in general a lot about this film I just didn’t understand. Whether it was decisions made by the characters, decisions made by the writers or decisions made by its director, The Predator is a film that left me utterly divided on how I felt about it, what I had watched and if I actually enjoyed it. This will be an interesting (difficult) review to write so let’s get to it and see if I can begin to get a grasp on the various bizarre elements of this film and how I truly felt about it. Read more

Review – American Animals

American Animals, written and directed by Bart Layton, went from what was at first a light-hearted but mostly placid adventure into what became an intense experience in which the true gravity of the situation had me sitting up-right in my chair, tensed up and fully attentive to the terror that was unfolding for the characters. All of this was made forever involving with some interesting cinematic choices that saw the film being more than just your typical telling of a true story. There are some really intriguing decisions which play into how this film was made and then presented and I’m looking forward to talking about some of them, so enough with this rambling introduction. Let’s get into the review. Read more

Review – Searching

Searching, co-written and directed by Aneesh Chaganty, takes a cinematic format that up until this point has been poorly done and instead delivers an extremely compelling, consciously gripping story that I enjoyed every second of getting to be a part of. Does the film completely nail it? No, and I’ll touch upon that, but there’s a very well-made film in Searching and I’m eager to talk about it, so let’s get to it. Read more

Review – Upgrade

Upgrade, written and directed by Leigh Wannell, offers some fascinating concepts in an intriguingly realised world. However, the exploration of these elements and its plot does feel a little shallow and mis-handled. Still though, there’s something undeniably gripping and unforgettable about Upgrade. So, let’s explore everything that the film has to offer and see if it’s one that’s worth checking out. Read more

Review – The Children Act

The Children Act, directed by Richard Eyre, poses an interesting dilemma; a moral question that grabs a hold of your inner voice and has it conflicted. It approaches its morally charged dilemma with strongly positioned characters who pull you into what should ultimately be a compelling, challenging film. But the handling of certain plot elements leaves the film struggling to achieve what it set out to tackle, which has leaves things feeling unfulfilling. So, let’s dive deeper into this film and see if it’s still able to offer a story that is worth your time. Read more

Review – Yardie

Yardie, directed Idris Elba, displays his experience and talent as an actor, but interestingly not from a performance stand point but in how he is able to get the best from his actors, and in turn form likeable, engaging characters whom you care about and are eager to watch. However, as a storyteller, Idris Elba’s inexperience behind the camera shows, as the film’s story feels clumsy and poorly paced. I’m really interested to review this film and explore not only its content, but also what the future holds for the beloved actor in a directing role. So, let’s bring this intro to a close and get on with the main review itself. Come join me, won’t you? Read more

Review – BlacKkKlansman

BlacKkKlansman, co-written and directed by Spike Lee, is a film that rings loud with the filmmaker’s distinctive voice and approach. Th purpose is undeniable, the boldness unflinching, and the tone in which it approaches its subject is very effective. It’s a film you can’t ignore – it won’t let you – nor should you. But the film’s strict focus does result in other elements of the film not feeling as complete as they should be, and it does result in what feels like an incomplete package. So, the question is: do those issues effect the film in such a way that it fails overall? Could the love of so many critics be misplaced? Let’s find that out and more in my review.    Read more

Review – The Equalizer 2

The Equalizer 2, directed by Antoine Fuqua, is a film with no tension, no suspense, no moment that thrills the senses or engages the mind. It is a film that holds within it… nothing. As someone who doesn’t like deconstructing a film purely on negative points; someone who tries to find the good in films and celebrate a medium of art that I adore and obsess over, I am going to severely struggle with this review, as there is truly no positive point that I can find to talk about. So, let’s make our way into a review that I won’t enjoy writing, and talk about a film I did not enjoy. Read more

Review – Terminal

Terminal, written and directed by, Vaughn Stein, allures you in with its stylish cinematography, its dialogue that glides throughout scenes and its eclectic assortment of characters. But soon, when all the glamour begins to ware-off and you look ever so slightly beneath the surface, you find a film without much depth and without much meaning. Now, the question is: despite the lack of depth and the lack of meaning, is there still a film in there worth watching? Well, let’s make our way on into my review and find out. Read more

Review – Zoe

Zoe, directed by Drake Doremus, had fleeting moments of genuine loveliness, but in large part was a film that felt distant and empty. In what feels like a wasted opportunity for an endearing, heartfelt film, Zoe slowly saw me losing engagement and interest over the course of its runtime. I’ll be bouncing back and forth in this review between the few things that I enjoyed and the larger, more prominent issues that resulted in a film I’m disappointed in. Let’s not waste anymore time on this intro and instead get into the review. Read more